Author: Daniel Tihn

Snatch never stops moving forward as Ritchie loses himself in the eclectic cast of comic criminals; a coherent plot sacrificed for a brighter spotlight on all the chess pieces as the game serves as but a backdrop for the pawns. Who doesn’t like a good gangster film? Ignoring the subjective debate of what ‘good’ means, it is hard to say no to a brief excursion into the criminal underworld, sans the danger and consequences, obviously. Contrary to the expression, rules are not made to be broken but refusing to comply with the system sends endorphins flying, elevated by our rebelliousness.…

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In her first outing as a titular character, Scarlett Johansson promises a grittier reprisal of the role only to be brought down by a clichéd story and oxymoronic costumes, ruining any hopes for a human spy thriller. Years after her debut in Iron Man 2, Black Widow has finally been allowed to escape the shackles of a supporting role and spin her own web. As Marvel’s Cinematic Universe expands and diversifies itself with shows such as Loki and WandaVision (stories that aren’t afraid to stray from the beaten path), it isn’t surprising that another fan favourite has been allowed to…

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Adored by many, Scott Pilgrim’s epic journey truly feels like a graphic novel brought to life; just like Frankenstein’s monster, the seams joining the different mediums can be jarring and alienating as Wright tries to hide the lacklustre story. The year is 2007, and Edgar Wright has just released the second film in the Three Flavours Cornetto trilogy: Hot Fuzz. Whether you prefer the comedy horror spoof Shaun of the Dead or its spiritual successor, it was clear that Wright had found his momentum and was on course to tie up the series nicely alongside co-writer and lead actor Simon…

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Wes Anderson’s take on the dysfunctional family balances the odd and appealing style with an insightful look into a damaged nuclear family, the two butting heads a bit too often. A retired tennis player famous for his on-court meltdown sits at the dinner table with his failed prodigy playwright sister, his business-minded and safety-skittish brother, his motherless nephews, and his author mother (and soon to be stepfather) while he advocates for their estranged father to move back into the family home. Eccentric and detailed characters? Colourful and flat shots? Straight to-the-point dialogue that can be simultaneously humorous and horrifying? The…

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Nomadland delivers on many fronts: innocent performances, cleverly awkward cinematography, and raw intimacy. Yet, Chloé Zhao’s factual but fictional style takes centre stage only to end up hindering what could have shined just a little bit brighter. Nomadland, at its core, strays from the beaten path. On one hand, the film wanders around aimlessly as a simple narrative is woven and ‘stretched’ into a feature film. Yet on the other, Chloé Zhao delivers an elegant and intricate portrait into a reality; every feeling carefully placed as an entire lifestyle is laid bare. This second view lies beyond the surface of…

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